Thoreau civil disobediance essay

In Civil Disobedience, Thoreau evaluates the federal government critically, contending that it is an artificial institution created by the powerful while acknowledging that it is believed to serve a purpose and is likely to remain a feature of American life. One of the factors that influenced Thoreau to consider civil disobedience as a method of resistance was the poor treatment of Mexico by the United States.

Thoreau civil disobediance essay

Table of Contents Summary Thoreau's Civil Disobedience espouses the need to prioritize one's conscience over the dictates of laws. It criticizes American social institutions and policies, most prominently slavery and the Mexican-American War.

Thoreau begins his essay by arguing that government rarely proves itself useful and that it derives its power from the majority because they are the strongest group, not because they hold the most legitimate viewpoint.

He contends that people's first obligation is to do what they believe is right and not to follow the law dictated by the majority.

When a government is unjust, people should refuse to follow the law and distance themselves from the government in general. A person is not obligated to devote his life to eliminating evils from the world, but he is obligated not to participate in such evils.

This includes not being a member of an unjust institution like the government. Thoreau further argues that the United States fits his criteria for an unjust government, given its support of slavery and its practice of aggressive war. Thoreau doubts the effectiveness of reform within the government, and he argues that voting and petitioning for change achieves little.

He presents his own experiences as a model for how to relate to an unjust government: In protest of slavery, Thoreau refused to pay taxes and spent a night in jail.

But, more generally, he ideologically dissociated himself from the government, "washing his hands" of it and refusing to participate in his institutions.

According to Thoreau, this form of protest was preferable to advocating for reform from within government; he asserts that one cannot see government for what it is when one is working within it.

Civil Disobedience covers several topics, and Thoreau intersperses poetry and social commentary throughout.

By Henry David Thoreau

For purposes of clarity and readability, the essay has been divided into three sections here, though Thoreau himself made no such divisions.In his essay, “Civil Disobedience” Thoreau wrote in after spending a night in the Walden town jail for refusing to pay a poll tax that supported the Mexican War.

He recommended passive resistance as a form of tension that could lead to reform of unjust laws practiced by the government. - Civil Disobedience and the Abusive Power of Government In response to the annexation of Texas in by the United States, Henry David Thoreau's wrote the essay, Civil Disobedience.

Thoreau felt that this purely economic move by the United States expedited the . Civil Disobedience.

Thoreau civil disobediance essay

in his chapter on the "Duty of Submission to Civil Government," resolves all civil obligation into expediency; and he proceeds to say that "so long as the interest of the whole society requires it, that is, so long as the established government cannot be resisted or changed without public inconveniency, it is the will of.

Mar 22,  · His essay "Civil Disobedience" has influenced countless great men, including Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. Although, he was regarded as a nature writer, "he declined membership in a scientific society, saying he was, 'a mystic, a transcendentalist, and a natural philosopher to boot'" (Thoreau .

According to Thoreau, this form of protest was preferable to advocating for reform from within government; he asserts that one cannot see government for what it is when one is working within it. Civil Disobedience covers several topics, and Thoreau intersperses poetry and social commentary throughout.

Civil Disobedience, by Henry David Thoreau Essay Words 5 Pages “Civil Disobedience” by Henry David Thoreau was a means of educating people on why they should not settle for a less than perfect government.

Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau